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An Evening with the Ambassadors: A Geopolitical Conversation with Ambassadors Hussain Haqqani and Christopher Hill

  • 06:00 PM
  • 970-476-0954

An Evening with the Ambassadors: A Geopolitical Conversation with Ambassadors Hussain Haqqani and Christopher Hill

Geopolitical

With Ambassadors Hussain Haqqani and Christopher Hill

Monday, Sept. 16, 2019
Doors open at 5:30 p.m.; program begins at 6 p.m.

Bard Residence | Beaver Creek


Once a cozy ally in the War on Terror, relations between the U.S. and Pakistan are now downright frosty. For its part, the U.S. has pivoted from Pakistan to India. Has this driven Pakistan into the welcoming arms of Iran and China? What will be the implications of this shift for the international effort against terror, as well as the balance of power in the region?
Two ambassadors take on the thorny issues associated with this strategic region. Pakistan’s economy teeters on the brink of disaster. How concerning are handouts from Saudi Arabia and China? Pakistan is one of more than 100 countries set to participate in China’s Belt and Road initiative. Does this signal Pakistan’s pivot from the U.S. to China? If so, what are the implications for U.S. interests in the region?  Other critical topics sure to be addressed include disputed Kashmir, Pakistan’s new Prime Minister Imran Khan, the military’s meddling in politics and whether or not resistance groups such as the Pashtun Protection Movement (PTM) can truly affect change. Join us for an incredible evening of conversation with these two insightful experts.
Ambassador Husain Haqqani served as Pakistan’s ambassador to the United States from 2008-2011 and is widely credited with managing a difficult partnership during a critical phase in the global war on terrorism. Considered an expert on radical Islamist movements, he is currently Director for South and Central Asia at Hudson Institute in Washington DC. Haqqani also co-edits the journal Current Trends in Islamist ideology.
Haqqani has been a journalist, academic and diplomat in addition to serving as advisor to four Pakistani Prime Ministers, including the late Benazir Bhutto. He received Hilal-e-Imtiaz, one of Pakistan’s highest civilian honors for public service. He has written for Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Financial Times, Washington Post, and The Telegraph, among others. His books include “Pakistan Between Mosque and Military,” “Magnificent Delusions: US, Pakistan and an Epic History of Misunderstanding,” “India v Pakistan: Why can’t we just be friends?” and “Reimagining Pakistan: Transforming a Dysfunctional Nuclear State.”
Ambassador Christopher R. Hill is currently the Chief Global Advisor at the University of Denver, Global Engagement. Prior to this position, he was the Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the university, a position he held from September 2010 to December 2017.
Hill is a former career diplomat, a four-time ambassador, nominated by three presidents, whose last post was as Ambassador to Iraq, April 2009 until August 2010. Prior to Iraq, Hill served as Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs from 2005 until 2009 during which he was also the head of the U.S. delegation to the Six Party Talks on the North Korean nuclear issue. Earlier, he was the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea. Previously he served as U.S. Ambassador to Poland (2000-2004), Ambassador to the Republic of Macedonia (1996-1999) and Special Envoy to Kosovo (1998-1999). He also served as a Special Assistant to the President and a Senior Director on the staff of the National Security Council, 1999-2000. Hill is the author of “Outpost: Life on the Frontlines of American Diplomacy: A Memoir,” a monthly columnist for Project Syndicate and a highly sought public speaker and voice in the media on international affairs.  
This program is generously underwritten by Pam & Richard Bard

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